What Would Jesus Blog?

March 7th, 2011 | Posted by:

Today’s post come from Cameron Nations and Gregory Damhorst, the founders and authors of the website Faith Line Protestants, a blog that seeks to initiate a conversation among Evangelical Christians about how to build strong and productive relationships with non-Christians. So, when an “open letter” was written by Frank Turk about my work for the strongly evangelical website Pyromaniacs last week, I reached out to Cameron and Greg to ask for advice on how I might craft a response. They informed me that they were already planning to write one.

Initially, I had planned to compose a response of my own to companion theirs, but after reading their beautiful (and I think overly generous, but that probably has more to do with my inability to receive compliments gracefully than anything else, ha) defense of me and my work, I’m not sure it’s necessary.

Thanks, guys, for saying what needed to be said. As you’ve said in the post below, you and Turk have one big thing in common — you’d like to see me come to Christ. But your approach is so different from Turk’s, and so grounded in the actual  practice of Jesus according to the Christian scripture, that it’s certainly the more compelling of the two. I may not be running to the nearest church to convert, but I am certainly inspired by your model of Christianity. Thanks for showing the world another way to follow Christ.

Anyway, I’ve said enough. Take it away, guys:

wwjbWhile we as Evangelical Christians discuss frequently on our site the importance of interfaith relationships – including relationships with those of a secular tradition – we are reminded that not everyone sees things the way we do.

Earlier this week, our friend Chris Stedman, a secular humanist and a leading voice for the involvement of the nonreligious in interfaith cooperation, was the target of an open letter written by Frank Turk, contributor to a Christian blog “PyroManiacs” (tagline: “Setting the world on fire…”). We wanted to respond – not because a response was invited, but because we are Evangelical Christians, we disagree with the approach to religious difference that particular Christians (“PyroManiacs” included) have taken, and because we are offended by the idea that someone representing Jesus Christ would make some of the statements that were made toward Chris.

Turk’s “Open letter” centers on a tweet posted earlier this month that read: “Exciting to hear about how @ChrisDStedman is reshaping the conversation between religious and nonreligious.” While Turk seemingly attempts to belittle Chris’s work by calling out his sexuality and tattoos, we are reminded of the very need for reshaping just such a conversation. Turk asks “Is that really ‘reshaping’ anything?”—in other words, is Chris really making a difference? And later implies that dialogue won’t change humanity’s propensity to, as he calls it, “err,” calling into question the very efficacy of the interfaith endeavor. We contend that Chris Stedman is in fact reshaping the conversation, and that constructive dialogue is playing a great part in this.

The conversation “between religious and nonreligious” as mentioned in the tweet is not a two-way discussion between Christians and atheists; rather, Christians and atheists are simply two pieces of a much broader discourse among peoples of all different faith traditions, worldviews, philosophies, and perspectives. Whether it is a church being bombed in Egypt, a pastor threatening to burn the Qur’an, or the recent protests of a Muslim community fundraiser in California, we would say that conversations around religious differences still need some major remodeling. And in the arena of atheists’ relationship to religion in particular, Chris is doing phenomenal work to show that being a non-religious person does not mean one has to be aggressively anti-religious. As a religious man himself, Turk should at least grant this much in Stedman’s favor.

We believe that interfaith cooperation efforts—and atheists/humanists’ involvement in them— are relevant, timely, and crucial in today’s global society, and that they stand in line with the values espoused by Christ to love one’s neighbor and bring peace to the world. Chris Stedman has contributed greatly to the cause of interfaith cooperation, making it a visible and vibrant part of the discussion happening on university campuses all across the country.

Because the model for interfaith cooperation to which we adhere depends upon mutual respect, value judgments on the morality of human sexuality or concern with one’s personal choices lie largely beyond the purview of the discussion. We, like Chris, simply advance the message of peace and sociological pluralism. Our concern is not with individual religious practice or belief or widespread social concerns except where they intersect with violence, strife, and bigotry. Our own Christian religious identity informs our desire to build bridges of cooperation with those of other traditions and worldviews, but does not in any way muddy our own values or compel us to entreat them on others.

Dialogue, though discounted in Turk’s letter, has the power to produce empathy through understanding. Part of the goal of interfaith cooperation is not simply an end to something (i.e. violence), but is actually a positive, proactive movement built around service that aims to improve our world and address the problems we face. (See Greg’s post on the Million Meals for Haiti even at UIUC for an example of this.)

As devout Christians, we understand the desire and imperative to point to Christ as the answer to any perceived iniquity; we want our friends to know Christ and his saving grace. Yet we often struggle with the way the church presents these messages of salvation to the world, having been frustrated by our own past experiences.

Chris Stedman, once a church-going Christian himself, doesn’t need a lesson on the teachings of Christ or what the Christian church believes about salvation; doubtless he has picked up on these things through his years as a member of the church and as a student in religious studies programs both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. We, like Turk, desire for Chris to know Jesus as his savior—Chris knows that full well.  But to see the gospel tacked on the end of a Bible-brandishing diatribe in which the author takes jabs at both Chris’s sexuality and his body art comes across as condescending.

The Bible states in 1 Peter 3:15:

“But in your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect”

We’d like to suggest that the conversation of interfaith cooperation – the precise conversation that Chris Stedman indeed does work to shape – presents a better opportunity for giving that answer mentioned in 1 Peter than the method observed in Turk’s “open letter.”  Ironically, this verse can be found on one of the “Pyromaniacs” logos plastered all over their site. Yet it seems they’ve forgotten this respect in their determination to criticize our friend and wave the gospel in his face.

Jesus’ ministry placed a heavy emphasis on relationships. He beckoned Zacchaeus down from the tree in order to have dinner with him. When at Mary and Martha’s house, he praised Mary for sitting and talking to him. One of the central sacraments of the church—the Eucharist—is in celebration and remembrance of a meal he had with his disciples. Indeed, relationships undergird the very reason Jesus had disciples, and God’s desire for relationships with all of us is in some sense the reason Jesus died for our sins.

Dialogue—or conversation— is implicit in relationships. In some sense conversing with God is what we do when we pray. What then does Turk mean when he asserts in his closing paragraph that Jesus isn’t “looking for a dialog?” Such a claim seems rather spurious. Also spurious is when Turk posits that leading an ethical life without God is not possible. Though a difficult, complex issue in its own right—one that we could write about at great length—looking at Chris’ work and Turk’s letter makes it seem clear that a belief in God, or lack thereof, doesn’t necessarily correlate with ethical behavior.

When reading Turk’s letter, we would ask: Does it work to build a strong relationship with Chris (or anyone, for that matter), or does it operate sans any personal ties? Does it do anything constructive, or does it attempt to deconstruct? Does it display a level of respect, or does it assume a moral high ground? Most importantly, for a Christian: does it seem to emulate Jesus?

Which of these approaches to dialogue—Chris’ or Turk’s—seems to embody Jesus’ compassion, vision for service, and emphasis on personal relationships? To us, it’s obvious.

damhorstGreg Damhorst, co-founder of Faith Line Protestants, was raised in the Evangelical Covenant Church, where he first learned the basics of his faith as an active member his congregation’s youth group. He studied physics as an undergraduate, and now is an MD/PhD student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he pursues a doctorate in Bioengineering developing a portable, low-cost, point-of-care device for HIV/AIDS diagnosis in resource-limited settings. Greg has been a leader with Interfaith in Action, the University of Illinois’ premier student interfaith organization, since early 2007. Motivated by Jesus’ compassion and ministry of healing, Greg is pursuing a career at the intersection of medicine, technology, and service, and he is interested in the role interfaith cooperation will play in the effort to bring health to the people who need it most.

cameronCameron Nations is co-founder of the website Faith Line Protestants, a resource devoted to promoting Christians’ involvement in interfaith cooperation, and is pursuing a degree in English Literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He serves in leadership positions in two prominent UIUC student organizations: the U of I chapter of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and on the executive board of Interfaith in Action. In October 2010, he had the opportunity to attend the Interfaith Youth Core’s Leadership Training Institute in Washington, DC as a student representative from UIUC. He is currently going through the discernment process for ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church.

  • http://www.twitter.com/ogoodrich Oliver Goodrich

    As the author of the tweet that “sparked” the controversy with Pyromaniacs, I’m grateful to Greg & Cameron for clarifying what I originally meant (obviously there are limits to 140 characters or less!). I appreciate their gentle response and the way in which they contribute positively to reshaping the dialogue.

  • http://bostonatheists.org Zachary Bos

    An excellent, thoughtful post.

  • kevin

    Wow, what a powerful and heartfelt letter. I wish I’d had folks like this to talk to when I was going through Confirmation class. Amazing work, if Evangelical or Christian equated to this world view for all that claim a Christian identity (or any other for that matter with a few linguistic changes) so much about the world would be a better place.

  • http://timbrauhn.com Tim Brauhn

    Well, that was a very sweet response, Cameron and Greg. Thank you.

  • http://hotforjesusformerfundie.blogspot.com Xtine

    For Chris – once again, I have great deal of respect for the challenging position you’re in – the balancing act is admirable and inspirational. I am very glad to see that there are evangelical Christians who recognize this and are willing to defend your work. Bravo to Greg and Cameron for recognizing that Chris understands what he no longer believes! That, in and of itself, gives me hope for the potential for civil dialogue between former believers and current believers.

  • http://www.zengnostica.com John J. DiGilio

    What a beautiful and thoughtful response. In my own reaction to Turk’s sugar-coated malice, I called his response an example of everything that is wrong with Christianity. I am touched to see that Greg and Cameron have been able to craft a message that captures the very essence of all that is right about it. Gentlemen, you bless us with your gentle and heartfelt candor.

    John

  • http://www.tayloryves.blogspot.com Taylor N.

    I’m glad to see these brothers stand up for you, Chris.

  • Wilbur Tagamet

    Some people are made of cheese, and some people are made for chess. These two guys went for the whole ball of wax, and came back with a little bit less.

    Kudos to you, for being afraid.
    Kudos to me, for baking the grade.
    Kudos to Chris, for posting this letter.
    Kudos to the internet – it’s bound to get better.

    My friends aren’t finished, my buds aren’t bested. Just wait till they get here right after they’ve rested!

    We’ll all find the time to control our publicity, if nothing else.

  • Jacob N. Shepherd

    This is one of my many poems…I’m an 87 year old WWII B-17 Combat Pilot who’s been tested!!

    Promises May Be Broken

    It’s awfully hard for me to understand why some folks don’t believe,
    That Jesus Christ can save their soul, they just cannot conceive,
    That this One Solitary Man can save the entire human race.
    Our belief is built on Faith alone, until we die
    and meet Him face to face!

    Some folks really are afraid of death, I think they’re afraid of Him.
    I am not afraid to die and I know it’s only because of Him.
    If I did not know and yes, believe, then I’d be afraid to die.
    They would have to bury me real deep so they couldn’t hear me cry!

    On another hand when Jesus takes my soul at death and looks me in the eye
    I think He’ll ask me then and there, are you ready to live here in the sky?
    I can answer loud and clear, Yes Lord, my Faith has made me whole.
    I see my friends and family who’ve gone before who welcome this old soul!

    Oh Lord, please help me to convince those folks who don’t believe
    To accept your offer of salvation, it’s the one thing they “must” achieve.
    We all have many offers of beliefs, but most won’t satisfy
    That longing put into our hearts by God to reach our homeland in the sky!

    Is it really possible to believe that there is no life after we die?
    That all the stories of God and Jesus are nothing but one big lie?
    The devil is a master showman and he has a powerful pitch.
    His major weapon is a promise, “follow me and you’ll be rich!”

    Promises, promises, sincere indeed, no truer words were ever spoken.
    We all hear promises every day, but most of them are broken.
    God, the only God, sent His Only Son Jesus Christ, down to the earth to die,
    And to save every single one of us who believe in God’s Heaven in the sky! (c) 2011

  • http://www.themessiahspurpose.com/ biblical interpretation

    Interesting it is always good to try and express faith in different was and to give people information about this.